How Does Hypothermia Therapy Help Babies Born with HIE?

How Does Hypothermia Therapy Help Babies Born with HIE?

Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is an especially traumatic birth injury. It occurs when the brain does not receive enough oxygen, such as when the umbilical cord is wrapped around a baby’s neck or if there is some sort of other major complication in childbirth.

Sometimes this error is the fault of the hospital, in which case a claim can be filed for negligence. HIE injuries can be severe or deadly, as brain cells will start dying after four minutes. HIE is a leading cause of cerebral palsy.

Statistics on HIE

According to the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Health, a report from the Children’s Hospitals Neonatal Consortium HIE focus group has provided some interesting statistics about HIE. The study considered 945 infants born with HIE:

  • 85 percent of those with HIE received therapeutic hypothermia
  • 26 percent had electrographic seizures
  • 15 percent of the babies considered in the study died from HIE

What is Therapeutic Hypothermia?

Babies with mild to moderate HIE will often be given hypothermia therapy. The therapy is used as the best method to reduce brain damage in a newborn. The child is cooled down to 33 degrees Celsius for 72 hours.

This therapy tends to be as successful as it is because the cold temperature slows down the biological process. While the damage is being restrained, the hospital professionals can work on treatments for a longer period than they could under normal circumstances.

Need a Birth Injury Attorney in Tampa, Florida?

If your child has received a birth injury due to hospital negligence, then you will want to call our attorneys at Farrell, Patel, Jomarron & Lopez. We have the necessary training, experience and commitment to help the families of children born with a birth injury or birth defect. Together we can build a strong case to recover maximum compensation for your child’s injuries.

[Did You Know?: The earliest premature baby to survive was 128 days premature]

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25393081

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